Rhubarb, the Pie Lover’s Delight

Rhubarb, a plant well known to pie and dessert lovers in Nebraska, has a long history in this state. Its use as a substitute for fruit in a newly settled country where fruit growing was limited made it popular with many pioneer housewives. Although the leaves were poisonous, the fleshy stalks were harvested and used for a variety of foods and medicines.

John Falter Jazz

One of the most interesting things I’ve discovered going through our John Falter collection in the last few years is how and how much of his personal interests, friends, and environs manifested themselves in his art.  Jazz is a great example.  Falter loved jazz from an early age and was a talented self-taught musician (clarinet and piano to be sure–perhaps even other instruments).   As a teen in Falls City he played in a band with George “Pee Wee” Erwin, who went on to a successful career as a jazz trumpeter.

The jazz theme appears in his teenage sketch/scrapbook . . .

The Death of Col. William McCord, First Nebraska Volunteer Infantry

April 6-7 (2012) marks the 150th anniversary of the 1862 Battle of Shiloh (aka Pittsburg Landing) in Tennessee, one of two major Civil War battles in which the First Nebraska Regiment participated. Commanding the regiment at Shiloh, as he had done at the previous Battle of Fort Donelson, was Lt. Col. William D. McCord of Plattsmouth, Cass County. If McCord had known he was soon to die, no doubt he would have preferred doing so while leading his men into battle.

Huff and Puff Not Enough to Destroy This Straw Building

Everyone has heard that necessity is the mother of invention. This is best exemplified in times of war, when the necessities of a country are tested to the maximum. During World War II, architects and builders were forced to find many alternatives to common building materials. But few alternatives have shown themselves to be as phenomenal and innovative as the construction of the Lone Oak restaurant in Lincoln.

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