Snowbound on a Train

Turkey from a Hog: Omaha’s First Christmases

To mark the approach of Christmas in 1889 the Omaha Bee published brief recollections by some of the city’s earliest settlers about their first observances of the holiday in Omaha. The Bee’s account, published on December 22, said: “The celebrations were crude. In the absence of homes, churches and social organizations, the male population of the village celebrated the day in a method that made up in vigor what was lacking in decorum.” 

“Grandma Gabel, she brought Ralph”: Midwifery and the Lincoln Health Department

By the early 20th century, most Anglo-American women had a physician present at births. However,  many rural, minority, or immigrant groups such as the Volga Germans still relied on midwives. As the Volga German population grew in Lincoln, Nebraska, difficulties with organizing birth records and accusations of quackery led to several confrontations between the tradition of midwifery and the Lincoln Department of Health. In the winter 2013 issue of Nebraska History, researcher Rebecca J.

The Santa Claus Survey, a Study in Child Psychology

“Sane Thanksgiving” Advised by Omaha Mayor

More than a month before the official Thanksgiving holiday in 1909, the Omaha Daily News on October 24 published the plea of mayor James C. Dahlman for what he called a "sane Thanksgiving." Dahlman, the colorful “perpetual mayor of Omaha,” said: "Unquestionably, men, women and children go to extremes in an observance of Thanksgiving day in some instances and it is about time their attention should be called to it.”

Become a History Nebraska Member Today

Learn More