agriculture

Mother and five children, 1920s

Ten percent of Nebraskans are Latino, part of a statewide community that is more than a century old. At first it was specifically a Mexican and Mexican-American community. The Spring 2019 issue of Nebraska History tells the story of the early decades.

magazine spread with photo of man swinging himself up into a boxcar

What was it like to live as a hobo? And what did hobos experience in Nebraska?

manure fork

These items were already heirlooms when they came to Nebraska in a covered wagon.

windmill in sandy pasture

windmill in sandy pasture

Ignore the photo above and look at the map below. Is “Great Desert” the dumbest description of Nebraska ever to appear in print? Sure, we’ve all heard “flyover country” and “middle of nowhere”—but desert? We might imagine a mapmaker who hadn’t been within 500 miles of Nebraska.

Take a look at this Map of Arkansa and other Territories of the United States (1822):

Welcome to Marker Monday! Each Monday we will feature one of Nebraska’s hundreds of historical markers. If you’d like to see a specific marker featured, send an email to jill.dolberg@nebraska.gov.

Welcome to our newest feature, "What Is It Wednesday"! Thanks to everyone who guessed - quite a few of you got this object right! While this particular artifact is not on exhibit, please visit the newly-renovated Nebraska History Museum at 15th and P Streets to engage with more fascinating Nebraska History!

May 11 Entry Side A - Nebraska State Historical Society

 

Welcome to Marker Monday! Each Monday we will feature one of Nebraska’s hundreds of historical markers. If you’d like to see a specific marker featured, send an email to jill.dolberg@nebraska.gov. Spring planting is well under way, so it's fitting we recognize some of Nebraska's first farmers - the Pawnee.

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