Civil War

Flashback Friday: Would J. Sterling Morton have sacrificed his grandmother for political gain?

In honor of Arbor Day, Nebraska History associate editor Jim Potter examines part of  the political career of Arbor Day founder J. Sterling Morton. Some dramatic anti-J. Sterling Morton sentiments appeared in the May 23 issue of the Republican Nebraska Herald, published in Plattsmouth. Under the headline “Not Ashamed of It,” the article reported Morton’s recent speech in Plattsmouth when he had asserted that he was unashamed of his political record.

The Election of 1864 and Nebraska

Buffalo Soldiers at Fort Robinson, Nebraska

In the racially segregated military that followed the Civil War, one of the first Cavalry regiments for black soldiers was headquartered in Nebraska for more than a decade. These soldiers played a notable role in social and military changes of the late 1800s. In the Spring 2014 issue of Nebraska History, Brian Shellum tells the story of the Ninth Cavalry Regiment, which fought discrimination as well as Indians on the Great Plains.

Nebraska Statehood Launched in Troubled Times

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