conservation

A Brush with Infamy

The staff at History Nebraska, including staff at the Ford Center, have spent the last year or so talking a lot about "curiosity".  We've had workshops and discussions about why people are curious, what they are curious about, how to increase and nurture our own curiosity to make our jobs easier and our output better.  One of the discussions was on topics that people are universally curious about.  These include things like: themselves (people everywhere are curious about themselves!), things we don't talk about in polite society (think death, sex and money), f

Lincoln's Final Decree

Not every project we work on at the Ford Center has dramatic before and after results.  Sometimes, the most important work we do is to stabilize an artifact for its long-term preservation.  Sometimes, the object doesn’t look much different from when it was brought in.  This was true for a document we treated for the Nebraska History Museum’s Nebraska Sesquicentennial exhibit.  It is a certificate appointing Alvin Saunders as the governor of the territory of Nebraska. The document is signed at the bottom right by Abraham Lincoln.

Immaculate Conservation

Much has been made over the last several years over “restoration” work performed by untrained people.  First there was the fiasco of the fresco “Ecce Homo” in the Sanctuary of Mercy church in Borja, Spain, which was restored by an elderly parishioner.  More recently, in June of 2018, there was the story of a group in Estella, Spain, that painted over a wooden statue of St George which dated back to the 16th Century.  You can read more about these pieces here.

Ledger Art

142 years can put a lot of wear and tear on a leather-bound diary. Our Ford Conservation Center fixed it up and preserved both the original diary entries and the Native American art within.

Promoter of Peace

The Objects Lab at the Ford Center recently treated a interesting frame for a painting of Logan Fontenelle.  It is a large, wooden frame for the portrait by artist William Andrew Mackay. Logan Fontenelle, or Shon-ga-ska (White Horse), was the last ruling Chief of the Omaha Tribe.  He was the son of Me-um-bane, the daughter of chief Big Elk, and Lucien Fontenelle, a French-American fur trader from New Orleans.  

Curtain Call

Many of the rural opera houses that once covered Nebraska are gone, but their painted curtains are often still around. Our Ford Conservation Center recently restored the curtain that decorated the Kearney Opera house for nearly 20 years.

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