Lincoln

Nebraska's American Legion

The NSHS Library/Archives is being assisted this summer by graduate intern, Nina Herzog. Nina comes to us from Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio. She is working with staff to organize various manuscript and photo collections and make them more accessible to the public. One of the collections that Nina has worked on includes the records of the American Legion, Department of Nebraska. The American Legion was officially established in 1919.

Nebraska Prisoners "in the biting stage"

The prisoners called it a protest. The guards called it a riot. But on August 16, 1955, fires blazed and smoke billowed out of the Nebraska State Penitentiary…and the inmates’ activism could be called anything but quiet. In the Spring 2015 issue of Nebraska History, Brian Sarnacki writes about the incident and the circumstances that led Nebraska inmates to violently demand prison reform.

NSHS 136th Annual Awards Presentation

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The Prohibition Party’s 1920 Dream Ticket: W. J. Bryan and Billy Sunday

Prohibition was the law of the land by 1920, but the Prohibition Party was still uneasy. As the presidential campaign season got underway, they feared that neither a Republican nor a Democratic president could be trusted to vigorously enforce the new law. Already there were proposals to weaken prohibition by modifying the law to allow the manufacture of light wines and beer.

Nebraska History Museum-on-the-Move Offers Programs Around Town

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Nebraska's Bones

Erwin Barbour’s family was very interested in old bones! From discovery to display, the family was a central part of Nebraska paleontology, expanding knowledge of the state’s fossils and making possible the University of Nebraska State Museum at Morrill Hall. In the Winter 2013 issue of Nebraska History, author Lois B. Arnold explores the family that had such a large impact on Nebraska paleontology as we know it.

“Grandma Gabel, she brought Ralph”: Midwifery and the Lincoln Health Department

By the early 20th century, most Anglo-American women had a physician present at births. However,  many rural, minority, or immigrant groups such as the Volga Germans still relied on midwives. As the Volga German population grew in Lincoln, Nebraska, difficulties with organizing birth records and accusations of quackery led to several confrontations between the tradition of midwifery and the Lincoln Department of Health. In the winter 2013 issue of Nebraska History, researcher Rebecca J.

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