History Nebraska Blog

Marker Monday: Territorial Church, Dakota County

Welcome to Marker Monday! Each Monday we will feature one of Nebraska’s hundreds of historical markers. If you’d like to see a specific marker featured, send an email to jill.dolberg@nebraska.gov.

If anyone has a better photo than this one, we'd be grateful to have it in our file. Please email jill.dolberg@nebraska.gov if you can help. 

Location

301-399 S 15th St, Dakota City, Dakota County, Nebraska View this marker's location 42.412712, -96.41751 View a map of all Nebraska historical markers, Browse Historical Marker Map

Marker Text

Near here stands the first Lutheran church building constructed in Nebraska. It has occupied this site since 1860. The congregation was first served by Reverend Henry W. Kuhns, a missionary sent by the Allegheny Synod to Nebraska Territory. Kuhns preached his first sermon in the front room of the Bates House (hotel) in November 1850 and formally organized the church on July 22, 1859. The membership immediately made plans for building, but their effort of moving an abandoned store from the abandoned town of Pacific City was frustrated when the structure was destroyed by a prairie fire while being moved to Dakota City. This church was designed and built by Augustus T. Haase, a local carpenter and member of the Emmanuel Lutheran congregation, at a cost of $2,000. For several years the building also served periodically as a Territorial courthouse, with religious services being held on Sunday as usual. Samuel Aughey, a leading scientist of the period, was the second pastor to serve the church. This old church still stands as a monument to the steadfastness of purpose of the early settler and as a symbol of pioneer religious life.

Further Information

Search results for "Territorial Church" on www.nebraskahistory.org

Nebraska Marker Project

The Nebraska Marker Project is for the repainting, repair and in some cases, replacement of state historical markers throughout the state. Nebraska’s markers share our exciting history for generations to come. Please consider donating by visiting the Nebraska Marker Project webpage at http://nshsf.org/the-nebraska-marker-project/.

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