Nebraska

Secretary of State William Jennings Bryan and the sinking of the Lusitania

Original Omaha “foot ball”

Even before Nebraska had the Husker football team, it had Omaha “foot ball” clubs that played what we now call soccer. The game’s growth in Omaha was similar to its growth in the rest of the United States: introduced by immigrants and spread by word of mouth. In the Spring issue of Nebraska History, author Bruce Gerhardt explores the earliest appearances of this old game in a young state.

When cowboys shot up Niobrara

For a short period of time, cattle drives were big business in Nebraska. After the Civil War ended in 1865, growing demand for beef plus a surplus of longhorn cattle in Texas led to thousands of Texas cattle being herded north to Nebraska, where the Union Pacific railroad transported them to the eastern states. Some cattle drives went even farther north, taking beef to Indian reservations in Dakota Territory. Early on, drives brought cattle to eastern and central parts of the Nebraska. Kearney was common destination in the mid 1870s.

Prairie Imperialists: Expansion from Nebraska to Cuba and the Philippines

As a result of the Spanish-American war of 1898, the United States was suddenly a colonial power, untested in the administration of overseas territory. George Meiklejohn, Charles Magoon, and John J. Pershing were three men who had seen the “taming” of the American frontier, and as they rose to national power they applied what they had experienced in the Midwest to colonies abroad. In the Winter 2014 issue of Nebraska History, Katharine Bjork explains how these three friends with roots in Nebraska had a lasting impact on U.S. colonial policy.

Finding Nebraska's Ghost Towns

The Nebraska History Museum's Last Tour

Last week, two of the Nebraska History Museum's docents made a bit of history. As they each led a group of elementary school students through exhibits focused on the First Nebraskans and Building the State, they gave the very last school group tours that would be offered in the Museum prior to its closure for renovation. It's the end of an era, but the newly renovated Museum (which has a planned reopening in 2016) will be even more valuable for generations of Nebraskans to come.

Kester Planing Mill listed on the National Register

Nebraska History Museum-on-the-Move Offers Programs Around Town

[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"4062","attributes":{"class":"media-image size-medium wp-image-1763 aligncenter","typeof":"foaf:Image","style":"","width":"300","height":"155","alt":"Museum on the Move"}}]]The Nebraska History Museum may be closing (on September 1) for renovation, but there are plenty of ways for you and your families to experience the great educational opportunities the Museum has to offer through its new Museum on the Move programming!

Winter Quarters Monument and commemoration

During the winters of 1846-47 and 1847-48, more than six hundred members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints died in their encampment, called Winter Quarters, on the banks of the Missouri River near Omaha’s present-day Florence neighborhood. These men, women, and children were among the large group of church members immigrating westward to the valley of the Great Salt Lake under the leadership of Brigham Young.

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