Nebraska

Huff and Puff Not Enough to Destroy This Straw Building

Everyone has heard that necessity is the mother of invention. This is best exemplified in times of war, when the necessities of a country are tested to the maximum. During World War II, architects and builders were forced to find many alternatives to common building materials. But few alternatives have shown themselves to be as phenomenal and innovative as the construction of the Lone Oak restaurant in Lincoln.

Todd Storz: Radio for a New Era

Todd Storz, owner of Omaha’s KOWH, saw music as opportunity. He showed the world how to harness music and make it profitable in a world more interested in visual stimulation than audio. Largely because of his invention and business efficiency, American radio was shaped into a form that is still popular today: Top 40.

Messages from the Great Beyond

The practice of Spiritualism primarily involved the communication with spirits or ghostly associations who have “gone over,” or died in the flesh. Claiming to be in contact with the beyond, the Fox sisters from New York are credited with starting the movement as early as 1848. Both Lincoln and Omaha City Directories indicated spiritualist churches were in operation at the turn of the twentieth century.

The Headless Ghost of Redington, Nebraska

The month of October can sometimes inspire images specific to the Halloween season. In December we think about Christmas, with brightly decorated trees and wrapped gifts full of surprise. In July we think red, white and blue thoughts as we celebrate the birth of our nation. But in October our imaginings seem to turn in a darker direction. Images of ghouls, ghosts and dealings with the undead fill that space occupied by dark autumn nights.

Happy Days

Ken Eddy's Drive-In was located at 48th and O Streets in Lincoln, Nebraska

Ken Eddy's Drive-In was located at 48th and O Streets in Lincoln, Nebraska. This photograph was taken by the Macdonald Studio on July 11, 1952. (RG2183.PH001952-00711-2) (above).

Happy Decoration Day!

According to the Seward Independent-Democrat newspaper (June 5, 1913), when the head of the parade reached Cottage Hotel, just north of the bridge, a halt was made.  The marchers opened ranks and the old soldiers, members of the Ladies Circle, and the flag bearers marched down between the two lines of school children. The children waved small flags as the old soldiers passed by.

Yearly memberships start at $32

Learn More